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  "I've no time," said he, "to be running after women. But the estatgrafik harga bitcoin idreI'll certainly have, because you can get that for me without mytroubling my head.""Is it a commission, then?" asked the other sharply.

"For my mistrhow to buy bitcoin in canada questradeess," said she, with an air of mystery."Why not take it to her, then?" inquired Rose.

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"I thought you might like to see it first, mademoiselle," saidJacintha, with quiet meaning."Is it from the dear doctor?" asked Josephine."La, no, mademoiselle, don't you know the doctor is come home? Why,he has been in the house near an hour. He is with my lady."The doctor proved Jacintha correct by entering the room in personsoon after; on this Rose threw down the letter, and she and thewhole party were instantly occupied in greeting him.When the ladies had embraced him and Camille shaken hands with him,they plied him with a thousand questions. Indeed, he had not halfsatisfied their curiosity, when Rose happened to catch sight of theletter again, and took it up to carry to the baroness. She now, forthe first time, eyed it attentively, and the consequence was sheuttered an exclamation, and took the first opportunity to beckonAubertin.He came to her; and she put the letter into his hand.

He put up his glasses, and eyed it. "Yes!" whispered he, "it isfrom HIM."Josephine and Camille saw something was going on; they joined theother two, with curiosity in their faces.Rose put her hand on a small table near her, and leaned a moment.The ladies managed to keep their countenances, but Dujardin'sdiscomfiture was evident.

He looked piteously at Josephine, and then asked Aubertin if theywere to set him down anywhere in particular."Oh, no; I am going with you to Frejus," was the quiet reply.Josephine quaked. Camille was devoured with secret rage: he lashedthe horse and away they went.It was a silent party. The doctor seemed in a reverie. The othersdid not know what to think, much less to say. Aubertin sat byCamille's side; so the latter could hold no secret communicationwith either lady.

Now it was not the doctor's habit to rise at this time of themorning: yet there he was, going with them to Frejus uninvited.Josephine was in agony; had their intention transpired through someimprudence of Camille?

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Camille was terribly uneasy. He concluded the secret had transpiredthrough female indiscretion. Then they all tortured themselves asto the old man's intention. But what seemed most likely was, thathe was with them to prevent a clandestine marriage by his barepresence, without making a scene and shocking Josephine's pride: andif so, was he there by his own impulse? No, it was rather to befeared that all this was done by order of the baroness. There was afinesse about it that smacked of a feminine origin, and the baronesswas very capable of adopting such a means as this, to spare her ownpride and her favorite daughter's. "The clandestine" is not allsugar. A more miserable party never went along, even to a wedding.After waiting a long time for the doctor to declare himself, theyturned desperate, and began to chatter all manner of trifles. Thishad a good effect: it roused Aubertin from his reverie, andpresently he gave them the following piece of information: "I toldyou the other day that a nephew of mine was just dead; a nephew Ihad not seen for many years. Well, my friends, I received lastnight a hasty summons to his funeral.""At Frejus?""No, at Paris. The invitation was so pressing, that I was obligedto go. The letter informed me, however, that a diligence passesthrough Frejus, at eleven o'clock, for Paris. I heard you say youwere going to Frejus; so I packed up a few changes of linen, and myMS., my work on entomology, which at my last visit to the capitalall the publishers were mad enough to refuse: here it is. Apropos,has Jacintha put my bag into the carriage?"On this a fierce foot-search, and the bag was found. Meantime,Josephine leaned back in her seat with a sigh of thankfulness. Shewas more intent on not being found out than on being married. ButCamille, who was more intent on being married than on not beingfound out, was asking himself, with fury, how on earth they shouldget rid of Aubertin in time.Well, of course, under such circumstances as these the diligence didnot come to its time, nor till long after; and all the while, theywere waiting for it they were failing their rendezvous with themayor, and making their rendezvous with the curate impossible. But,above all, there was the risk of one or other of those friendscoming up and blurting all out, taking for granted that the doctormust be in their confidence, or why bring him.At last, at half-past eleven o'clock, to their great relief, up camethe diligence. The doctor prepared to take his place in theinterior, when the conductor politely informed him that the vehiclestopped there a quarter of an hour.

"In that case I will not abandon my friends," said the doctor,affectionately.One of his friends gnashed his teeth at this mark of affection. ButJosephine smiled sweetly.At last he was gone; but it wanted ten minutes only to twelve.Josephine inquired amiably, whether it would not be as well topostpone matters to another day--meaning forever. "My ARDOR ischilled," said she, and showed symptoms of crying at what she hadgone through.

Camille replied by half dragging them to the mayor. That worthyreceived them with profound, though somewhat demure respect, andinvited them to a table sumptuously served. The ladies, out ofpoliteness, were about to assent, but Camille begged permission topostpone that part until after the ceremony.At last, to their astonishment, they were married. Then, with apromise to return and dine with the mayor, they went to the cure.

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Lo and behold! he was gone to visit a sick person. "He had waited along time for them," said the servant.Josephine was much disconcerted, and showed a disposition to cryagain. The servant, a good-natured girl, nosed a wedding, andoffered to run and bring his reverence in a minute.

Presently there came an old silvery-haired man, who addressed themall as his children. He took them to the church, and blessed theirunion; and for the first time Josephine felt as if Heaven consented.They took a gentle farewell of him, and went back to the mayor's todine; and at this stage of the business Rose and Josephine at lasteffected a downright simultaneous cry, apropos of nothing that wasthen occurring.This refreshed them mightily, and they glowed at the mayor's tablelike roses washed with dew.But oh! how glad at heart they all were to find themselves in thecarriage once more going home to Beaurepaire.Rose and Josephine sat intertwined on the back seat; Camille, thereins in his right hand, nearly turned his back on the horse, andleaned back over to them and purred to Rose and his wife withineffable triumph and tenderness.The lovers were in Elysium, and Rose was not a little proud of hergood management in ending all their troubles. Their mother receivedthem back with great, and as they fancied, with singular, affection.

She was beginning to be anxious about them, she said. Then herkindness gave these happy souls a pang it never gave them before.Since the above events scarce a fortnight had elapsed; but such achange! Camille sunburnt and healthy, and full of animation andconfidence; Josephine beaming with suppressed happiness, and morebeautiful than Rose could ever remember to have seen her. For asoft halo of love and happiness shone around her head; a new andindefinable attraction bloomed on her face. She was a wife. Hereye, that used to glance furtively on Camille, now dwelt demurely onhim; dwelt with a sort of gentle wonder and admiration as well asaffection, and, when he came or passed very near her, a keenobserver might have seen her thrill.

She kept a good deal out of her mother's way; for she felt withinthat her face must be too happy. She feared to shock her mother'sgrief with her radiance. She was ashamed of feeling unmixed heaven.But the flood of secret bliss she floated in bore all misgivingsaway. The pair were forever stealing away together for hours, andon these occasions Rose used to keep out of her mother's sight,until they should return. So then the new-married couple couldwander hand in hand through the thick woods of Beaurepaire, whosefresh green leaves were now just out, and hear the distant cuckoo,and sit on mossy banks, and pour love into one another's eyes, andplan ages of happiness, and murmur their deep passion and theirbliss almost more than mortal; could do all this and more, withoutshocking propriety. These sweet duets passed for trios: for ontheir return Rose would be out looking for them, or would go andmeet them at some distance, and all three would go up together tothe baroness, as from a joint excursion. And when they went up totheir bedrooms, Josephine would throw her arms round her sister'sneck, and sigh, "It is not happiness, it is beatitude!"Meantime, the baroness mourned for Raynal. Her grief showed nodecrease. Rose even fancied at times she wore a gloomy anddiscontented look as well; but on reflection she attributed that toher own fancy, or to the contrast that had now sprung up in hersister's beaming complacency.

Rose, when she found herself left day after day alone for hours, wassad and thought of Edouard. And this feeling gained on her day byday.At last, one afternoon, she locked herself in her own room, and,after a long contest with her pride, which, if not indomitable, wasnext door to it, she sat down to write him a little letter. Now, inthis letter, in the place devoted by men to their after-thoughts, bywomen to their pretended after-thoughts; i. e., to what they havebeen thinking of all through the letter, she dropped a careless hintthat all the party missed him very much, "even the obnoxiouscolonel, who, by-the-by, has transferred his services elsewhere. Ihave forgiven him that, because he has said civil things about you."Rose was reading her letter over again, to make sure that all theprincipal expressions were indistinct, and that the compositiongenerally, except the postscript, resembled a Delphic oracle, whenthere was a hasty footstep, and a tap at her door, and in cameJacintha, excited.

"He is come, mademoiselle," cried she, and nodded her head like amandarin, only more knowingly; then she added, "So you may burnthat." For her quick eye had glanced at the table."Who is come?" inquired Rose, eagerly."Why, your one?""My one?" asked the young lady, reddening, "my what?""The little one--Edouard--Monsieur Riviere.""Oh, Monsieur Riviere," said Rose, acting nonchalance. "Why couldyou not say so? you use such phrases, who can conjecture what youmean? I will come to Monsieur Riviere directly; mamma will be soglad."Jacintha gone, Rose tore up the letter and locked up the pieces,then ran to the glass. Etc.Edouard had been so profoundly miserable he could stand it nolonger; in spite of his determination not to visit Beaurepaire whileit contained a rival, he rode over to see whether he had nottormented himself idly: above all, to see the beloved face.

Jacintha put him into the salle a manger. "By that you will see heralone," said the knowing Jacintha. He sat down, hat and whip inhand, and wondered how he should be received--if at all.In glides Rose all sprightliness and good-humor, and puts out herhand to him; the which he kisses.

"How could I keep away so long?" asked he vaguely, and self-astonished."How indeed, and we missing you so all the time!""Have YOU missed me?" was the eager inquiry.

"Oh, no!" was the cheerful reply; "but all the rest have."Presently the malicious thing gave a sudden start."Oh! such a piece of news; you remember Colonel Dujardin, theobnoxious colonel?"No answer.

"Transferred his attentions. Fancy!""Who to?""To Josephine and mamma. But such are the military. He only wantedto get rid of you: this done (through your want of spirit), hescorns the rich prize; so now I scorn HIM. Will you come for awalk?""Oh, yes!""We will go and look for my deserter. I say, tell me now; cannot Iwrite to the commander-in-chief about this? a soldier has no rightto be a deserter, has he? tell me, you are a public man, and knoweverything except my heart.""Is it not too bad to tease me to-day?""Yes! but please! I have had few amusements of late. I find it sodull without you to tease."Formal permission to tease being conceded, she went that instant onthe opposite tack, and began to tell him how she had missed him, andhow sorry she had been anything should have occurred to vex theirkind good friend. In short, Edouard spent a delightful day, forRose took him one way to meet Josephine, who, she knew, was cominganother. At night the last embers of jealousy got quenched, forJosephine was a wife now, and had already begun to tell Camille allher little innocent secrets; and she told him all about Edouard andRose, and gave him his orders; so he treated Rose with great respectbefore Edouard; but paid her no marked attention; also he wasaffable to Riviere, who, having ceased to suspect, began to likehim.In the course of the evening, the colonel also informed the baronessthat he expected every day an order to join the army of the Rhine.Edouard pricked his ears.The baroness said no more than politeness dictated. She did notpress him to stay, but treated his departure as a matter of course.

Riviere rode home late in the evening in high spirits.The next day Rose varied her late deportment; she sang snatches ofmelody, going about the house; it was for all the world like a birdchirping. In the middle of one chirp Jacintha interfered. "Hush,mademoiselle, your mamma! she is at the bottom of the corridor.""What was I thinking of?" said Rose.

"Oh! I dare say you know, mademoiselle," replied the privilegeddomestic.A letter of good news came from Aubertin. That summons to hisnephew's funeral was an era in his harmless life.

The said nephew was a rich man and an oddity; one of those who loveto surprise folk. Moreover, he had no children, and detected hisnephews and nieces being unnaturally civil to him. "Waiting to cutme up," was his generous reading of them. So with this he made awill, and there defied, as far as in him lay, the laws of nature;for he set his wealth a-flowing backwards instead of forwards; hehanded his property up to an ancestor, instead of down to posterity.All this the doctor's pen set down with some humor, and in the calmspirit with which a genuine philosopher receives prosperity as wellas adversity. Yet one natural regret escaped him; that all thiswealth, since it was to come, had not come a year or two sooner.

Both Sides of the Table

Perspectives of a 2x entrepreneur turned VC at @UpfrontVC#

Mark Suster

Written by

2x entrepreneur. Sold both companies (last to salesforce.com). Turned VC looking to invest in passionate entrepreneurs 〞 I*m on Twitter at @msuster

Both Sides of the Table

Perspectives of a 2x entrepreneur turned VC at @UpfrontVC, the largest and most active early-stage fund in Southern California. Snapchat: msuster

Mark Suster

Written by

2x entrepreneur. Sold both companies (last to salesforce.com). Turned VC looking to invest in passionate entrepreneurs 〞 I*m on Twitter at @msuster

Both Sides of the Table

Perspectives of a 2x entrepreneur turned VC at @UpfrontVC, the largest and most active early-stage fund in Southern California. Snapchat: msuster